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Film Studies

As a student of Film Studies you will undertake a systematic study of cinema and film. Film is arguably the most influential and culturally significant art form of the present. It is certainly the only new art form produced in the Twentieth Century.
What is Film Studies?

It goes without saying that A Level Film Studies revolves around films. As a student of Film Studies you will undertake a systematic study of cinema and film. Film is arguably the most influential and culturally significant art form of the present. It is certainly the only new art form produced in the Twentieth Century.
 
You will examine cinema in the context of its production, circulation and consumption within society. You will also look at how cinema creates meaning and communicates through images and sounds i.e. the ‘language of film’.

What is Film Studies at DLD?

A Level Film Studies is taught in a well equipped environment, which includes state of the art computers specifically used for film editing and a large screen facility for watching films. A wide range of teaching methods is employed by an enthusiastic team of tutors. Much of the A level specification revolves around independent research and production work and tutors are fully experienced at guiding and encouraging such activities.

How is it assessed?
    Weighting Format
Unit 1 Exploring Film Form 20% (40%) Coursework
Unit 2 British and American Film 30% (60%) Examination
Unit 3 Film research and Creative Projects 25% Coursework
Unit 4 Varieties of Film Experience 25% Examination

 
Exam Board: WJEC

What do I need?

You need to bring with you an enthusiasm for Film as well as an open mind and a willingness to discuss and debate in the classroom. No matter what sort of films you usually watch, we can guarantee that you will be viewing films that you would never have expected to see – and most of the time you will be more than pleasantly surprised. You should also go to the cinema as often as possible (and also watch films regularly on TV and DVD).

Good subject combinations

Some of our past students have joined the course simply because they love films. Some have joined because they thought that they might like to learn about film-making as a possible future career. Some are fascinated by the more academic approach to the art form. What is certain is that our film students have a varied repertoire of courses that they attend as well as Film. Popular combinations include English Literature, Psychology, Drama and Theatre Studies and Sociology but the beauty of Film is that it can complement any subject combination.

After DLD

There are now many Film Studies courses available at University. They tend to fall into two types -those that involve a more academic study of Film as one of the most important art forms of the last 100 years and those that will involve you in learning the art of film-making itself and possible equip you for a career in the film and/ or television world. Film can also be studied as a part of a joint degree course – for instance, many universities offer Film and English as a popular option.
 
That said, if you have caught the film-making bug then you will need to start knocking on doors right away.

Questions

Q: Do I need to have done Film Studies at GCSE?
A: No. But it helps!
 
Q: Can I do the course in one year?
A: It has been done. It involves a great deal of work and is very time consuming.

Entry Requirements for international students

To study A Levels, your current or pending exam results should be equivalent to or higher than GCSE (General Certificate of Secondary Education) in at least 5 subjects and a minimum level of English equivalent to IELTS 5.0.
 
At the start of each academic year of study students following an A-Level course without a pass at grade C in GCSE or IGCSE English Language or with an Academic English score below 6.5 overall must join an Academic English training course for the duration of the academic year which will be timetabled alongside A-Level lessons.
 
If your level of English is not sufficient to meet the entry criteria for the A-Level programme you will normally be offered a place on the Abbey DLD Colleges One Year Pre-sessional (Pre A-Level) in order to bring your English skills up to the required level.

I really enjoy Film Studies because I love filming, editing and also analysing films. This subject has given me the ability to improve my skills and helped me decide to go on even further in this field, which is why I will be studying Media at university.

Luna Al-Akkad – DLD Graduate/p>

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